Angst

Angst means fear or anxiety (anguish is its Latinate equivalent, and anxious, anxiety are of similar origin). The word angst was introduced into English from the Danish, Norwegian and Dutch word angst and the German word Angst. It is attested since the 19th century in English translations of the works of Kierkegaard and Freud.[1][2][3] It is used in English to describe an intense feeling of apprehension, anxiety, or inner turmoil.

In German, the technical terminology of psychology and philosophy distinguishes between Angst and Furcht in that Furcht is a negative anticipation regarding a concrete threat, while Angst is a non-directional and unmotivated emotion. In common language, however, Angst is the normal word for “fear”, while Furcht is an elevated synonym.[4]

In other languages having the meaning of the Latin word pavor for “fear”, the derived words differ in meaning, e.g. as in the French anxiété and peur. The word Angst has existed since the 8th century, from the Proto-Indo-European root*anghu-, “restraint” from which Old High German angust developed.[5] It is pre-cognate with the Latin angustia, “tensity, tightness” and angor, “choking, clogging”; compare to the Ancient Greek ἄγχω (ankho) “strangle”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angst

I am one who counts myself a part of Generation X.  As such, perhaps I have had a generational predisposition toward “Angst”.  In so many of the cultural endeavours & thoughts of my generation – not to mention the Philosophies I studied at University – this idea of “Angst” has predominated.  From the Grunge music I listened to, to the philosophical ideas of the Existentialists – this idea coursed through my final years of formal education.

So am I filled with Angst?

Continue reading

Advertisements

Scarecrow

Do you take me as a scarecrow?
Do I not yearn to fly?
Crucified and stuffed with straw, condemned to live a lie

from Dirge For A Mutinous Philosopher
Captain Vulpine

The image of a lonely Scarecrow protecting a farmer’s field is an archetype most of us can envision instantly.  There they stand, lonely & protective – yet ultimately powerless.  As Captain Vulpine says in his amazing song: “condemned to live a lie”

Continue reading

Knowing What You Want…

“We do not know what we want and yet we are responsible for what we are – that is the fact.”

– Jean Paul Sartre

About a week or so ago I posted some Sartre quotes & promised to share my thoughts on this famous Existentialist’s words.  The above quote has always sparked deep ideas in my mind.  Let me expand on some of my thoughts…

We are born, creatures in this existence, with endless Possibility laid out before us.  Anything & everything is Possible.  All it takes is for us to decide – to Choose what we want.  Yet the problem is we rarely know what we want.  Sure, we are told a lot of things as we grow up & experience the world around us.  Our parents, our teachers, our friends & society in general tell us all about the good life & what we should expect & want out of it.  Yet do any of these things Truly equate with what we want as Individuals?

Continue reading

Sartre Quotes

“We mean that man first of all exists, encounters himself, surges up in the world – and defines himself afterwards.”

“We do not know what we want and yet we are responsible for what we are – that is the fact.”

And of course, his most famous:

“Hell is other people.”

Got me thinking today… stay tuned for my thoughts on such fancies…

A Long Week Ahead…

Have you ever noticed, when you have a day off during the week (like on a Friday), that the entire week drags on as if that day off will never arrive?  One would imagine that a four day work week would be experientially faster then the regular five day work week.  But this rarely seems the case.

Is it Einstein’s fault for pointing out how Time is relative?  Or are we programed to experience a kind of suffering until we are able to enjoy the extra liberty we desire?

I will make it through this week.  Four days only (& the first day is half done).  Then I will be camping this weekend.  The wait will be worth the adventure.  I must be a little more Buddhist.  I must acknowledge that I may suffer this week & move on.  Raise myself above such simple distractions & enjoy the moment – no matter what may be happening.

I hope you can do the same.

Blessed Be.

The Never Ending Journey…

        Behind every Door is a possibility.

 

        Behind every Fear is a crutch.

 

        Behind every Spirit is a desire.

 

      Behind every Choice is a reason.

    Five more to face.

    Five more to bear.

    Five more to suffer.

    Yet we must acknowledge that there is Suffering & move on…

    Four times ten plus three times two & an extra two…

    Shadows…

    Puppeteers…

    Illusions upon a stone wall…

    I see this.

    Yet I Choose to accept their Validity.
    I give them Authority over me.
    Yet I still have my Will to Power…

    Fresh air & grasslands await me.

    I will return Home.
    I will be where I am meant to be at the moment I am meant to be.

    I just need to take that next step…

    The Journey never ends. Every new corner simply opens up more possibilities.

    Blessed Be.

    Faol (The Wolf)

    Howlsnow - JPEGFaol


    The sign-bearing wolf shall lead his troops, and surround Cornwall with his tail.

    from The Prophecies Of Merlin

    The Wolf. Mighty canine, archtypal pack animal, both revered and feared by humans throughout the ages. Faol is the Gælic, the Welsh is Blaidd and there are countless other names in countless other languages. The Wolf represents a strong sense of faithfulness, intuition, inner strength and the ability to learn. When challenges face you and you find that you might have to go beyond “normal” behaviour & take risks in order to progress and learn – the mighty Faol can help. It can teach you about your own inner power and inner strength which often manifests itself when you are alone. In the darkest of wildernesses, the Wolf can help you find courage through spiritual companionship allowing you to discover your deepest self. Wolves are highly social intelligent and friendly – like most canines. They also embody a wildness not found in domesticated dogs although they are often valued for their affinities with humans.
    Continue reading